Educators Continue to Find Education Service Centers Invaluable

Texas educators continue to find services provided by the 20 Texas Regional Education Service Centers (ESCs) invaluable, and school leaders strongly approve of the support being provided.  The Institute for Organizational Excellence at The University of Texas at Austin conducted a survey of 1,288 leaders of school districts and charter schools on their satisfaction with services provided by the 20 ESCs, as required by the Texas Education Code. On average, the ESCs scored a 4.78 on a 5 point scale based on 14 different service areas. Respondents were asked to describe their level of satisfaction on a variety of ESC services such as those designed to help schools operate efficiently and economically, support for Bilingual and ESL Education, and support in the core academic areas (mathematics, science, social studies, and English Language Arts.)  For most items, 96% of respondents expressed that they were very satisfied or satisfied with ESC services.

“We are very happy with these results and continue to focus on ensuring that each person that interacts with an ESC has a positive experience,” said Danny Lovett, Executive Director of Region 5 ESC in Beaumont. Lovett added, “ESCs take pride in providing high-quality services that help students, teachers, and schools be successful and operate as efficiently and effectively as possible. We look forward to continuing to provide these services in the future.”

The survey was conducted electronically in the fall of 2013 and received a 73% response rate.  The instrument included 14 quantitative items and allowed for respondents to provide comments about services, suggest new services, and make comments on services not mentioned in the quantitative section of the survey. Educator comments were positive and expressed appreciation for the degree of support received and money saved by utilizing their ESC. Respondents also described their ESC as an invaluable resource that provides an exceptional level of service.

The Texas Legislature has charged ESCs with providing products and services that help schools operate more efficiently and economically.  The 20 ESCs are located in Edinburg, Corpus Christi, Victoria, Houston, Beaumont, Huntsville, Kilgore, Pittsburg, Wichita Falls, Richardson, Fort Worth, Waco, Austin, Abilene, San Angelo, Amarillo, Lubbock, Midland, El Paso, and San Antonio.  A study prepared for the 83rd Legislature found that ESCs provide more than $830 million in cost savings per year to Texas schools through various products and services.

2013 Client Satisfaction Survey- Executive Summary

2013 Client Satisfaction Survey Report

El Paso Times Honors ESC 19 Executive Director Jimmy Vasquez on 60 Years of Service to Texas Students

The El Paso Times Editorial Board has authored an editorial honoring Region 19 Executive Director Jimmy Vasquez on his retirement after SIXTY years of service to Texas public education.  You can read the full editorial here.

Region 13 Employees Honor the 150th Anniversary of the Gettysburg Address

ESC 13 employees took part in the Learn the Address initiative by PBS in an effort to commemorate the 150th Anniversary of President Lincoln’s historic Gettysburg Address.  People were challenged to record themselves reciting the Gettysburg Address and share it online to honor this historic speech and its meaning to the United States.  We hope everyone takes a moment to read the words aloud and remember the sacrifices people have made for our country; giving what President Lincoln called “the last full measure of devotion.”  On this day, we encourage everyone to read the words and remember that we are all blessed to call this nation home and that words can still have a powerful impact on all of us 150 year later.  We hope you enjoy our video and will be inspired to make one of your own.

Video: Region 13 Reading of the Gettysburg Address

 

The Gettysburg Address

November 19, 1863

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate—we cannot consecrate—we cannot hallow—this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.